Legend of Blitzkid

Pictures, maps, memories and stories

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby rebbonk » Sun Sep 11, 2022 3:01 pm

Thank you for sharing that Blitzkid. That's the first I've heard of it.

Now, I wonder if you can help me? I'm interested in 'flying wings'. I have the picture below, and the 'wing' looks somewhat out of place. Could you identify it?

Image
Of course it'll fit; you just need a bigger hammer.
User avatar
rebbonk
 
Posts: 60723
Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:01 am

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby rebbonk » Sun Sep 11, 2022 9:56 pm

My current research identifies the 'wing' as possibly being the Pterodactyl made by Westland-Hill. It certainly shows how forward-looking the company was when you look at the rest of the picture.
Of course it'll fit; you just need a bigger hammer.
User avatar
rebbonk
 
Posts: 60723
Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:01 am

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby Blitzkid » Tue Sep 13, 2022 5:36 pm

REBBONK not that advanced, The photo looks like it's carrier towed behind behind a cruuiser they launched off this carrier fighter planes into the air-- the beginning of Aircraft Carriers, it also looks like englands first airdrome.
User avatar
Blitzkid
 
Posts: 270
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2022 6:33 pm

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby rebbonk » Tue Sep 13, 2022 6:47 pm

Blitzkid, do you ever remember the AWA 'flying wing' being towed around our locality? When I was an apprentice, one of the guys I worked with told me a few tales, but I'd like to add to what I was told. I understand that Baginton was key in the development unless you know otherwise?
Of course it'll fit; you just need a bigger hammer.
User avatar
rebbonk
 
Posts: 60723
Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:01 am

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby Blitzkid » Wed Sep 14, 2022 9:31 am

Rebbonk, Looks like Eastchurch, Englands first Aerodrome in 1910 this is were all, here and at Brooklands flying was first practised their friends used to lie flat on the grass and if they could see between machine and grass then they were up, and people cheered.
User avatar
Blitzkid
 
Posts: 270
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2022 6:33 pm

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby Blitzkid » Sat Sep 24, 2022 1:40 pm

Dutchman, A cinema in Belgium was packed by people watching GONE WITH THE WIND

When a V2 rocket fired from Holland hit it point blank, over a thousand killed but it was not released until the 1980’s
User avatar
Blitzkid
 
Posts: 270
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2022 6:33 pm

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby dutchman » Sat Sep 24, 2022 1:42 pm

Interesting Blitzkid :thumbsup:

I knew a British soldier who was stationed in Antwerp at the time but he didn't go into details. His impersonation of a Belgian tram fare collector got really tedious after a while: "Alstublieft, s'il vous plait?"
User avatar
dutchman
Site Admin
 
Posts: 45716
Joined: Fri Oct 23, 2009 1:24 am
Location: Spon End

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby Blitzkid » Sat Sep 24, 2022 1:43 pm

I spent three days in TOULON close after the Brits where blamed for the scuttling of their NAVY we we not friendly treated.
User avatar
Blitzkid
 
Posts: 270
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2022 6:33 pm

Re: Legend of Blitz-kid

Postby dutchman » Sat Sep 24, 2022 1:45 pm

I can imagine Blitzkid!

Oddly there was no hostility where my dad's family lived in Holland despite an allied bombing raid two years earlier which caused many civilian casualties. They were just really glad to see the Germans gone.
User avatar
dutchman
Site Admin
 
Posts: 45716
Joined: Fri Oct 23, 2009 1:24 am
Location: Spon End

Re: Legend of Blitzkid

Postby Blitzkid » Mon Sep 26, 2022 5:07 pm

Dutchman I spent two years in the middle east, chasing history as well as doing my duty and several times in Rome, I hope I learnt some history that was useful, not the kings and queens of England, that just kept going from one castle to another. I also stayed in a few monastaries, today we know of fishbourne, that plant names today are so much the same as Latin. Coventry lost most most of its history in the heat of wartime blitz, but our forums do not mention this when they write about the blitz, scores of documents, books the ARCHDEACON of Huntingdon wrote an eight -book of plants, that all monasteries grew, I can name scores of books that you can't find today, but you could have before the blitz. The book calendula was one such book----I believe Coventry had 13 Benedictine monks to represent the number of disciples.
User avatar
Blitzkid
 
Posts: 270
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2022 6:33 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Local History

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

  • Ads